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A vegetarian world would be healthier, cooler and richer: scientists Arts & Entertainment2 MINS AGO BY AGENCIES Vegeterian By eating less meat and more fruit and vegetables, the world could avoid several million deaths per year by 2050, cut planet-warming emissions substantially, and save billions of dollars annually in health care costs and climate damage, researchers said.  A new study, published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, is the first to estimate both the health and climate change impacts of a global move toward a more plant-based diet, they said.  Unbalanced diets are responsible for the greatest health burden around the world, and our food system produces more than a quarter of greenhouse gas emissions, said lead author Marco Springmann of the Oxford Martin Programme on the Future of Food.  “What we eat greatly influences our personal health and the global environment,” he said.  The Oxford University researchers modelled the effects of four different diets by mid-century: a ‘business as usual’ scenario; one that follows global guidelines including minimum amounts of fruits and vegetables and limits on red meat, sugar and total calories; a vegetarian diet; and a vegan diet.  Adopting a diet in line with the global guidelines could avoid 5.1 million deaths per year by 2050 while 8.1 million fewer people would die in a world of vegans who do not consume animal products, including eggs and milk.  When it comes to climate change, following dietary recommendations would cut food-related emissions by 29 percent; adopting vegetarian diets would cut them by 63 percent and vegan diets by 70 percent.  Dietary shifts could produce savings of $700 billion to $1,000 billion per year on healthcare, unpaid care and lost working days while the economic benefit of reduced greenhouse gas emissions could be as much as $570 billion, the study said.  REGIONAL DIFFERENCES  The researchers found that three-quarters of all benefits would occur in developing countries although the per capita impacts of dietary change would be greatest in developed nations, due to higher rates of meat consumption and obesity.  The economic value of health improvements could be comparable with, and possibly larger than, the value of the avoided damage from climate change, they added.  “The value of those benefits makes a strong case for increased public and private spending on a program aimed to achieve healthier and more environmentally sustainable diets,” Springmann said.  The study looked at regional differences which could be used to identify the most suitable interventions for food production and consumption, Springmann said.  For example, lower red meat consumption would have the biggest effect in East Asia, the West and Latin America, while boosting fruit and vegetable intake was found to be the largest factor in cutting deaths in South Asia and sub-Saharan Africa.  Lower calorie intake, leading to fewer overweight people, would play a key role in improving health in the Eastern Mediterranean, Latin America and Western nations, the study said.  But it will not be easy. To achieve a diet that sticks to common guidelines would require a 25 percent increase in the number of fruits and vegetables eaten globally and a 56 percent cut in red meat.  Overall humans would need to consume 15 percent fewer calories, it said.  “We do not expect everybody to become vegan,” Springmann added. “But climate change impacts of the food system will be hard to tackle and likely require more than just technological changes. Adopting healthier and more environmentally sustainable diets can be a large step in the right direction.”

A vegetarian world would be healthier, cooler and richer: scientists Arts & Entertainment2 MINS AGO BY AGENCIES Vegeterian By eating less meat and more fruit and vegetables, the world could avoid several million deaths per year by 2050, cut planet-warming emissions substantially, and save billions of dollars annually in health care costs and climate damage, researchers said. A new study, published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, is the first to estimate both the health and climate change impacts of a global move toward a more plant-based diet, they said. Unbalanced diets are responsible for the greatest health burden around the world, and our food system produces more than a quarter of greenhouse gas emissions, said lead author Marco Springmann of the Oxford Martin Programme on the Future of Food. “What we eat greatly influences our personal health and the global environment,” he said. The Oxford University researchers modelled the effects of four different diets by mid-century: a ‘business as usual’ scenario; one that follows global guidelines including minimum amounts of fruits and vegetables and limits on red meat, sugar and total calories; a vegetarian diet; and a vegan diet. Adopting a diet in line with the global guidelines could avoid 5.1 million deaths per year by 2050 while 8.1 million fewer people would die in a world of vegans who do not consume animal products, including eggs and milk. When it comes to climate change, following dietary recommendations would cut food-related emissions by 29 percent; adopting vegetarian diets would cut them by 63 percent and vegan diets by 70 percent. Dietary shifts could produce savings of $700 billion to $1,000 billion per year on healthcare, unpaid care and lost working days while the economic benefit of reduced greenhouse gas emissions could be as much as $570 billion, the study said. REGIONAL DIFFERENCES The researchers found that three-quarters of all benefits would occur in developing countries although the per capita impacts of dietary change would be greatest in developed nations, due to higher rates of meat consumption and obesity. The economic value of health improvements could be comparable with, and possibly larger than, the value of the avoided damage from climate change, they added. “The value of those benefits makes a strong case for increased public and private spending on a program aimed to achieve healthier and more environmentally sustainable diets,” Springmann said. The study looked at regional differences which could be used to identify the most suitable interventions for food production and consumption, Springmann said. For example, lower red meat consumption would have the biggest effect in East Asia, the West and Latin America, while boosting fruit and vegetable intake was found to be the largest factor in cutting deaths in South Asia and sub-Saharan Africa. Lower calorie intake, leading to fewer overweight people, would play a key role in improving health in the Eastern Mediterranean, Latin America and Western nations, the study said. But it will not be easy. To achieve a diet that sticks to common guidelines would require a 25 percent increase in the number of fruits and vegetables eaten globally and a 56 percent cut in red meat. Overall humans would need to consume 15 percent fewer calories, it said. “We do not expect everybody to become vegan,” Springmann added. “But climate change impacts of the food system will be hard to tackle and likely require more than just technological changes. Adopting healthier and more environmentally sustainable diets can be a large step in the right direction.”

By eating less meat and more fruit and vegetables, the world could avoid several million deaths per year by 2050, cut planet-warming emissions substantially, and save billions of dollars annually… Read more »

Pakistani conjoined twins successfully separated in Riyadh

Pakistani conjoined twins successfully separated in Riyadh

Pakistani conjoined twins Fatima and Mashael were successfully separated in a surgery at King Abdullah Specialist Hospital for Children in King Abdulaziz Medical City for the National Guard in Riyadh,… Read more »

Fish-inspired contact lenses with auto focus coming soon

Fish-inspired contact lenses with auto focus coming soon

nspired by the uniquely shaped retina of fish, scientists have designed new contact lenses that can adjust focus within milliseconds. The lens could be life-changing for people with presbyopia, a… Read more »

Second case of polio comes to surface

Second case of polio comes to surface

The year’s second case of polio in Sindh was confirmed on Thursday in a child who belonged to Jacobabad. Sindh reported its first case of polio this year on February… Read more »

USOC forms medical group to guard against Zika in Rio

USOC forms medical group to guard against Zika in Rio

  Rio de Janeiro: The United States Olympic Committee (USOC) on Friday announced the formation of a medical advisory group to protect US athletes and staff against infectious diseases, including… Read more »

Sindh Drug Testing Lab rendered useless due to govt apathy

Sindh Drug Testing Lab rendered useless due to govt apathy

KARACHI: Injections seized by the Sindh Drug Testing Laboratory (SDTL) during the last three years were not analysed if they conform to standards of use or are life-threatening. Geo News… Read more »

Coffee at night disrupts body’s internal clock: study

Coffee at night disrupts body’s internal clock: study

Miami: Drinking coffee before bedtime disrupts the body’s internal clock, making it harder to get to sleep on time and more challenging to wake up in the morning, US researchers… Read more »

Portion size key in tackling obesity, says study

Portion size key in tackling obesity, says study

Reducing the portion sizes offered in supermarkets, restaurants and at home would help reverse the obesity epidemic, say researchers. They say their review of 61 studies provides the “most conclusive… Read more »